Damn Your Eyes by Matt Clifford

Damn Your Eyes front
Cover Design by Jona Fine.

DAMN YOUR EYES BOOK RELEASE

Damn Your Eyes by Matt Clifford will officially release October 26, 2017.  To request a  PDF for review, email thepaperplanepilots@gmail.com

Damn Your Eyes:

Edited by Michael J. Hetzler
Interior photos by Chris Eason
Back desciption by Brice Maiurro
Interior Design by Sara Khayat

Cover design by Jona Fine

Back Description

Matt Clifford is spiking the Kool-Aid.
A caustic, yet vulnerable, thirty-something brat.
He builds a box just to escape it.
Self-deprecating, but he’s taking you with him.
Matt Clifford is Denver, but he’d never admit it.
This book is equal parts Matt and Clifford, but only sometimes.
Matt is a full-time poet who sunlights as a tax accountant.
His poems are, at once, collective and separate.
Damn your preconceived notions.
Don’t be so reliant on a back cover to tell you what to think.
This book deserves to be read.
Damn this book.
Damn your eyes.

ABOUT MATT CLIFFORD

Matt Clifford is a coastal transplant, city-ruining culture suck, snorting stardust off angels’ halos like a tax accountant and decorating the loft of his mind with student loan art. His poems don’t make sense, his band doesn’t even play real songs, and he can’t grow facial hair.

RELEASE READING

Please join the Paper Plane Pilots in welcoming Matt Clifford to Los Angeles for the release reading of his latest book of poetry, Damn Your Eyes (Paper Plane Pilots, 2017).

Urban Social House
5220 Hollywood Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90027

Join & view the Facebook Event here.

GOODREADS GIVEAWAY

Goodreads Book Giveaway

Damn Your Eyes by Matt Clifford

Damn Your Eyes

by Matt Clifford

Giveaway ends November 15, 2017.

See the giveaway details
at Goodreads.

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Interview with Eric Morago

In November of 2016, the Paper Plane Pilots had the honor of publishing Feasting on Sky by Eric Morago.

I initially met Eric during my undergraduate studies. The writing circle at my school announced a reading featuring Eric Morago. After hearing his poetry, I bought his book and proceeded to follow his writing for the next four years.

Eric’s poetry had a large influence on the growth of my writing. I had initially sought a degree in creative writing to develop my fiction, but after hearing Eric read, I realized that I gravitated toward contemporary poetry.

Thanks to Eric, I am now not just a poet, but a publisher of poetry working with some of my major influences.

Now, four years later, I’m pleased to present to you an interview with Eric Morago on his latest book published by Paper Plane Pilot Publishing, Feasting on Sky:

feasting-on-sky-web
Cover art by Gabriel Chavez. Cover design by Laura Khayat.

SK: What was your main goal with Feasting on Sky?

My last book was more of a collection about love and longing, and with Feasting on Sky, I wanted the narrative to evolve and take risks.  My goal, working on these poems, was to explore subject matter that was uncomfortable to confront, to shine light on some of those guarded parts of myself that I keep hidden from the everyday world.  As someone who struggles with anxiety on an almost daily basis, there’s often a lot of shame associated with admitting it, but in my poems, I find I can take ownership over it.     

SK: What type of poetry do you aim to write? Who is your demographic?

I set out to write poems that communicate to the reader, and audience, what I am thinking and feeling in way that allows them room to infer their own meaning.  In doing so, I hope my poems reward with multiple readings. I consider my style direct and sincere.  As for my demographic, I want my poetry enjoyed by the “everyman,” by those who wouldn’t expect they’d like hearing/reading a poem, so I strive to make my work, as Billy Collins would say, “hospitable.”  I try never to alienate my readers with ambiguous imagery or obtuse language, yet still strive to explore complex themes.  

SK: You write a lot about mental illness in this book.  What effect do you hope to have by elucidating this topic?

I hope to empower others who suffer from some form of mental illness and to start a dialogue about how it’s more normal than not to feel a little abnormal.   

SK: Who are your main influences as a writer?

I tend to gravitate to poets who write clearly and with a razor’s edge honesty.  I enjoy reading poems that are bravely imaginative and offer surprising imagery.  I like poets that make me laugh as well.  There are so many poets I could name that have inspired and influenced me over the years, but if I had to name three who have had the biggest effect on my growth as a writer, I’d give credit to Charles Harper Webb, Ron Koertge, and Mindy Nettifee.

SK: What role does your humor play in this book?

Humor plays a large role not only in this book, but also in my writing.  I think humor is the perfect vehicle to drive a reader through complex emotion.  Humor is healing.  When we laugh, we open ourselves to the bigger truths of the universe, reflect, and release.  

SK: What does performance provide that unspoken words can’t?  Is there a particular poem from this collection that you love performing?

Performance allows a poet to really bring a particular piece to life.  Not all poets are skilled in performance, nor do they need to be.  But, if a poet knows how to read well, they can captivate and engage an audience with more than just their words on the page.  As far as a particular poem from the book that I love performing, it changes based on how I’m feeling on that particular day and on the audience.  

SK: What do you think poetry can achieve that other forms of writing can’t?

I think poetry, as a writing form, can offer a more concise and intimate look into an experience, and benefits from the musicality of language more so than other genres of writing can.

SK: What do you particularly love about the literary scene in Los Angeles?

What I love most about the literary scene in Los Angeles is its diversity of voices, and how vastly rich this city’s poetry is with its history and culture.

SK: Do you have any social media links you would like to share?

Sure.  If people want to stay up-to-date on what I’m doing in the poetry world, they can like my Facebook author page . You can also follow me on Instagram where I usually post pictures of my dogs, Legos, and sometimes my writing life.

SK: What’s next for Eric?

I’ll be setting up readings throughout Spring for Feasting on Sky, but will also be starting an exciting chapter in my life as the new publisher and editor-in-chief of Moon Tide Press.  I am very grateful for this opportunity and looking forward to giving back to so many deserving writers (and readers) of great poetry.

If you are in Los Angeles and would like the chance to see Eric perform in the coming weeks he will be a feature at:

Coffee Cartel in Redondo Beach with the Redondo Poets on Tuesday January 17th at 8 PM.

1820 S Catalina Ave #102
Redondo Beach, CA 90277

He will also be a feature for Two Idiots Peddling Poetry at The Ugly Mug in Orange on Wednesday January 25th at 8 PM ($3 cover).

261 N Glassell St
Orange, CA 92866

Eric Morago is a two-time Pushcart Prize nominated poet who believes performance carries as much importance on the page, as it does off. Currently he hosts a monthly reading series, teaches writing workshops, and serves as an associate editor for the online literary journal, FreezeRay Poetry. Eric is the author of What We Ache For (Moon Tide Press) and has an MFA in Creative Writing from California State University, Long Beach. He lives with his wife and three dogs in Los Angeles, California.


Sara Khayat was born and raised in Los Angeles, California. She is editor-in-chief of Paper Plane Pilot Publishing. Her latest book, ¶: unspeakable poems, is an experimentation with strikethrough and language (nouns that become verbs, verbs that become nouns in different contexts). She always chose truth over dare at elementary school parties. Proof of her writing can be dated all the way back to old kindergarten findings and floppy disks. Her mind is full of wildflowers, ladybugs and grey matters. Give her a shout and she’ll give you a whisper.

Interview With Jent Garrison

Why do you write? What is your motivation ?

My motivation is my sanity. I feel that if I didn’t I would be a completely different person, bottled up with all this useless energy and emotion. For as long as I can remember I have written to make myself feel better, and get whatever I am feeling out in the open.

Besides writer’s block, what can be a challenge for you when writing?

Rewriting a piece until it becomes terrible. I try not to read things over and over again because if I do the more I change it the worse it usually gets.

How do you pass writer’s block?

Let it work itself out. I try not to force it and I focus on other things. Once I start doing other things all I want to get back to doing is writing.

How often do you write? Is it premeditated or spontaneous?
Never premeditated always spontaneous. I tend to write minimum of once a day. Whenever I feel it’s necessary to.

Within the last three years how has your writing evolved?

I think it has evolved dramatically with the events that have taken place in my life. I’m always writing loosely about my current situations in life, so given my shift in life over even the past year I’d say it has evolved into a type of writing I never thought I’d dive into.

How often do you write pieces that you don’t post/publish?

A lot more than I do post/publish. I post things I feel people want/need to hear, and I won’t post certain things if I wrote it specifically to give to someone, or sometimes I honestly can’t bring myself to post some things I’ve written. Maybe someday…

If you could put any author/writer in your pocket, who would it be? Why?

Mitch Albom, just to see what his take on everything I do would be. Have always loved his writing, wouldn’t mind a few daily conversations with the guy.

Do you prefer ebooks, paperback or hardcovers?

Paperback…for life!

Do you feel that traditional paperback and hardcover books will no longer exist?

I believe they always will. Nothing can compare to holding the weight of a book and turning pages dramatically as you race to the end of a great story.

If you were the original creator of any book and/or film, what would it be? Why?

The usual suspects. Because that is a brilliant film and a brilliant story, and always will be the film that made me want to become a writer.

Where do you want to be in 5-10 years ?

Writing televisions series and creating stories that people love and hate to get attached to.

Interview with Holden Lyric, conducted by M. Alden

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  1.  How do you perceive that your voice and style has developed since you began writing?

When I first began writing, I was a kid. I wrote short stories just for fun and saved them to my floppy disk. I recently found a story I wrote when I was five. It depicted a day where it rained pennies. I thought to myself: Why pennies? Why not quarters or hundred dollar bills? I think in first grade my teacher read one of my stories aloud to the class. In junior high I thought it was “uncool” to write, so I began writing music instead. ln high school, I reconnected with writing and began my first novel.

So, I guess my writing has aged much like a body would. Wiser, but more concerned with aesthetic.

2 Your poems are constructed using a myriad of forms and tropes such as strikethrough, parentheses, and spacing in between letters. What poets have influenced this aspect of your work, and how do you tend to employ it?

Hm, that’s a good question. I just get bored with one certain aesthetic and have to change it up. It’s like an itching in me to try something new. My mind starts to pace and it won’t settle unless I feel there’s some kind of evolution taking place. E. E. Cummings was a huge influence for me in that regard. It’s actually funny. In school, I was really antiform in poetry. I hated form with all of my guts. But, in hating form, my lack of form became a form? A lot of peers that reviewed my work in workshop called me a “form” poet and I was like…wait…WHAT. It’s funny to me now. A lot of things are.

3 You write a variety of both poems and short stories. How does your writing process differ between the two, and do you have a preference for one or the other?

AH! haha that is a great question. I don’t have a preference. I tend to use both formats in their own way. When I’m aiming for raw and honest, I write a poem. When I’m aiming to unleash feelings or ideas I find wouldn’t fit well with a poem, I tend to bury them in a story. Stories, to me, are a way of elongating and exploring a certain feeling or emotion that I don’t feel comfortable doing with a poem. I love to get lost in worlds, which I find I can’t really do with a poem. When working on a novel, I look up after hours of writing and feel like I really just escaped to this place only I have the key to enter. It’s an incredible experience I can’t quite describe.

Sometimes, I confuse myself. I don’t know whether or not what I’m writing is a poem or a story. Often, I find people tend to see my poetry as narrative poetry and my prose as poetic prose. So maybe it all just blends together.

  1. Do you feel that reading and writing poetry has shaped the way you perceive the world?

Yes, I do. Before I wrote poetry I used to be a really quiet person. I never spoke. I had a lot of thoughts and opinions, but I never voiced them. I always felt they weren’t well-formed opinions or convinced myself they didn’t matter. Once the poems started flowing, I became a lot louder. I made a lot of friends, and the conversations I’ve been apart of with creative people on curbsides, in parking lots, and on random front porches are some memories I value most.

  1. What is your dream career?

I’d like to be an editor for a publishing company. I love the process of creating, and I’ve done a lot of freelance editing as well as working for some presses in the past. I’ve edited manuscripts of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction.

  1. What places, people, and moments have most influenced you as a writer?

Well, my mother was definitely a huge influence when I was a kid. She was a Literature teacher and definitely encouraged creativity. We used to get prizes for reading books. One summer, I read 60 books and I got a gameboy. My siblings were mad because I was the youngest and they said the books were “easy”. (The books were written for a demographic three grades ahead of me though, it was totally fair! Ahem, we still debate about this.)

Also, a friend of mine in high school (I won’t call him out, but he is a Paper Plane Pilot) used to lend me novels. We used to sit in the back of our chemistry honors class and talk about philosophy, the beats, art, film, you name it. I ended up failing the class and having to take summer school.

  1. How has being a writer impacted your own sense of identity?

Well, there were things I never really paid much attention to when growing up until I started writing. For instance, my spinal surgery, Lebanese-American identity (or lack of haha). It has also helped me get through some other hard times as an adult that I think would have been really difficult to get through if I wasn’t able to write out some kind of a conclusion or insight.

One question I do often ask myself after I’ve had a taxing day or am feeling emotionally overwhelmed by a situation is: What can you take from this?

  1. If you could collaborate with any writer, who would you choose and why?

This is tough. haha I want to answer this question, but it’s kind of personal and I don’t want to call this person out. (I’m a terrible poet if I still have a sense of “too personal”)

Though, I’d say, if it’s just a writer I admire and don’t know personally, I’d go with Aimee Bender. But then I’d probably end up freaking out and thinking my work was shit and go in the fetal position in the corner and stay there for a few days.

  1. You began PPP in 2012, and since then the collective has put forth two anthologies, a chapbook, and hundreds of poems and stories. What hopes do you have for PPP in the coming years?

My vision for Paper Plane Pilots has changed dramatically over the years. At first, it was just an online workshop for some friends. Then we randomly gained followers, and lost the “workshop” vibe. We started In-flight Literary Magazine because I wanted the opportunity to publish people outside of the collective’s work. I also wanted it to be peer-reviewed, since Paper Plane Pilots isn’t (unless you include me editing every post.) My aim is to promote global empathy and bring writers from all over the world together to share in their common love for expression.

  1. What do you hope to achieve with your work?

Honestly, I have no idea. My goal when I was younger (and naïve) was to be able to make a living on writing. Now I kind of just want to reach people. I want to connect with people and be able to discuss the art and more meaningful topics with great minds. I guess it’s just a good (and valuable) way of passing the time.

  1. What inspires you to initiate a poem or story?

It can start with anything. I could be listening to a song and mishear a lyric, I could be driving on the freeway and my “inner voice” will say something that I feel starts a poem, I could be watching a TV show and think, man I thought this is where they would go with this, a certain experience I have, or maybe a true story I hear.

For instance, this is the idea I’ve had for a story for a while now:

I found out recently that I am a citizen of Lebanon by birth. I was born in Hollywood, but since my dad is a Lebanese native, apparently his children are also Lebanese citizens? Once I found that out, I came up with an idea for this short story (I won’t give too much away here, because I have yet to write it.)

I feel like that was a long tangent and I don’t know how to bring it back.

  1. What is your ideal writing environment?

Hm. I do like a lot of silence. I’ve never been able to write with other people around (including classrooms and cafes.) Sometimes, I do write in my phone when I’m out. I think I have like 1,000 notes in my phone. I just pretend like I’m texting and I blend in. I get distracted really easily, though. So it helps if it’s a secluded, familiar place.

  1. What does your personal editing process look like?

Usually I write it out and I end up hating the form and change the form. I don’t do too much editing on my work, which I’ve actually been trying to change. It’s not because I think it’s perfect, I’m just afraid of messing it up even more. haha If I don’t know where to go with a piece, I usually just send it to a friend and ask their opinion on it. (Which you’ve been the victim of a few times. haha [is it normal to say “haha” in an interview?])

  1. How would you characterize your own writing voice?

My writing voice is much like vomit. Okay, that’s not very appetizing. I’d say it really depends. It could be stream of consciousness. I’ve been told very opposing things. Some people think I’m really funny, which confuses me? Some people think I’m really depressing, which, makes a lot more sense.

I always try to find the beauty and the hope, even in writing about something that is seemingly devoid of both. I never like to write “mean” things about people. I always try to find the beauty, even if I have to invent it myself.

One thing I will say is: I try to make my writing accessible to the reader whether through narrative, vernacular speech, or even just accessible language.

A short conversation with Dani Blue

I had the pleasure of interviewing the beautiful and talented Dani Blue…and here is what she had to say!
What is your main inspiration when starting to write?
When I feel that it is time to sit down and write, something has happened. I heard something, seen something, or had an odd reality check. There’s a ton of emotions scrambling to get out so that I can move on and stamp it “lesson learned”.
What do you feel is your biggest challenge?
My biggest challenge is committing to a story. I’m sad to admit that I’m a commitment phobe. Although, I’d rather convince myself that I’m not. I’ll work hard and spew loads of energy into a short story.
Do you believe your personality and writing style are similar? Why or why not?
Yes! And it’s something that I used to despise and wanted to run away from. For awhile it was hard to separate the two. Combining my writing style and personality once was a way to glamorize myself to myself–more than others–and I didn’t like that. Now  I embrace it, balance the two, without writing Stephanie’s fairytale volumes 1-3.
When did you decide to start writing?
I started writing when I was in middle school. So around 12-13 years old.
Is length important to you when writing a piece?
Usually l don’t consider length unless it’s required for an assignment.
What do you do when you get writer’s block?
In the past, when I would suffer from writer’s block syndrome, I would completely abandon a story. Literally I’d get up, go make a sandwich, maybe even make another one and forget about the story. I’ve found that ranting in a freewrite helps and gets me in a place to continue.
Do you get inspired by any specific authors? If so whom?
Most authors that I’ve read have in some type of way inspired me in one way  or another
What is your favorite book/line or section from that book?
Alright, I absolutely admit my favorite book changes from time to time. Right now it’s Chronicle of a Death Foretold, a novella by Gabriel Garcia Marquez. It’s a crazy journey that begins and ends several times in several ways.
Do you like or dislike books being made into films?
If I love the book–meaning I’ve read it more than once and it’s packed away in my book collection in my mom’s garage–then I’m not the happiest person when it turns into a film. It’s really not the same. But I will still watch it and then buy it on blu-Ray.
Where do you see yourself going in the future?
Hmm, the future. Honestly, my future is quite unclear at this point. I packed all my things and drove up to Seattle with my boyfriend in a two week timeframe. In a month I could be the president of a small island. I am planning on continuing my education and I’m positive that great things are ahead of me.
Where do you see the publishing world going in the future?
It seems that the publishing world is expanding more and more everyday. Self-publishing doesn’t seem as frowned upon. Big publishers should watch out.
Where is your favorite place to write?

Washington is beautiful. The scenery here is absolutely awesome. By far my favorite place to write.